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RFPs

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A request for proposals (RFP) is a funder’s written announcement inviting proposals, usually for a specific grant program. 

  • Our office serves as a clearinghouse for many RFPs. Current opportunities can be found below.
  • We disseminate select RFPs via email directly to faculty and administrators in relevant schools and centers.
  • If an RFP is a limited funding opportunity, for which a limited number of applicants per institution may apply, it is generally announced by the Stanford Research Development Office and an internal selection committee decides on the final candidate(s). UCFR manages a small number of limited RFPs, as indicated below.
  • Additional RFP resources are listed on the Funding Search Tools page.

Funding Opportunities & Resources


May Deadlines:

Retirement Research Foundation

Grantmaking Program

The Retirement Research Foundation (RRF) focuses on improving the quality of life for older people. In an effort to strengthen the Foundation’s impact, RRF has established Priority Areas. These Priority Areas are specific topics in aging that will be given higher priority within the Foundation’s grantmaking program.

  • Caregiving: Ensuring that caregivers are informed, well-trained, and supported, while providing care to older people in community settings.
  • Economic Security in Later Life: Valuing the dignity of older people through efforts that ensure and protect their economic security and well-being.
  • Housing: Promoting efforts that make housing more affordable and provide coordinated services that enable older people to live safely in community settings.
  • Social and Intergenerational Connectedness: Strengthening social bonds through efforts that promote meaningful connections, including those that span generations.

Each priority area will afford an opportunity for RRF to fund innovative and effective projects that support the ability of older people to live fully in community settings. Within these areas, RRF will continue to award grants involving advocacy, direct service, professional education and training, research, and organizational capacity building. While the priority areas reflect RRF’s primary funding interests, we will remain open to considering compelling applications addressing other topics on a limited basis.

Funding amount: Varies (approx. range $20K-$200K)

Deadline: May 1, 2024 (Letters of Inquiry)

Guidelines: https://www.rrf.org/apply-for-a-grant/

William T. Grant Foundation

Research Grants on Reducing Inequality and Research Grants on Improving the Use of Research Evidence

Research grants on reducing inequality fund research studies that aim to build, test, or increase understanding of programs, policies, or practices to reduce inequality in the academic, social, behavioral, or economic outcomes of young people ages 5-25 in the United States. We prioritize studies that aim to reduce inequalities that exist along dimensions of race, ethnicity, economic standing, language minority status, or immigrant origins.

Our research interests center on studies that examine ways to reduce inequality in youth outcomes. We welcome descriptive studies that clarify mechanisms for reducing inequality or elucidate how or why a specific program, policy, or practice operates to reduce inequality. We also welcome intervention studies that examine attempts to reduce inequality. Finally, we welcome studies that improve the measurement of inequality in ways that can enhance the work of researchers, practitioners, or policymakers.

Research grants on improving the use of research evidence fund research studies that advance theory and build empirical knowledge on ways to improve the use of research evidence by policymakers, agency leaders, organizational managers, intermediaries, and other decision-makers that shape youth-serving systems in the United States.

This program supports research on strategies focused on improving the use, usefulness, and impact of evidence in ways that benefit young people ages 5-25 in the United States. We welcome impact studies that test strategies for improving research use as well as whether improving research use leads to improved youth outcomes. We also welcome descriptive studies that reveal the strategies, mechanisms, or conditions for improving research use. Finally, we welcome measurement studies that explore how to construct and implement valid and reliable measures of research use.

We are particularly interested in research on ways to improve the use of research evidence by state and local policymakers, mid-level managers, and intermediaries. These decision-makers play important roles in deciding which programs, practices, and tools to adopt; deliberating ways to improve existing services; shaping the conditions for implementation; and making resource allocation decisions.

We invite studies from a range of disciplines, fields, and methods, and we encourage investigations into various youth-serving systems, including justice, housing, child welfare, mental health, and education.

Funding amount: $100K-$600K (Research grants on reducing inequality); $100K-$1M (Research grants on improving the use of research evidence)

Deadline: May 1, 2024

Guidelines: https://wtgrantfoundation.org/funding#current-opportunities

Nasdaq Foundation

Quarterly Grant Program

Established in 1994, the Nasdaq Foundation works to connect business, capital and innovative ideas to advance global economies and local communities to champion diversity in investor engagement. Driven by Nasdaq's Purpose to advance economic progress for all, the Foundation works with organizations that promote and support under-resourced communities by reimagining investor engagement and equipping communities with the financial knowledge needed to share in the wealth that markets create. The Quarterly Grant Program allows us to move nimbly to fund and help scale programs that align with the Foundation's mission.

Program Criteria

1.       Empower organizations that equip diverse investors with the financial knowledge and confidence they need to share in the wealth that markets can create. Grants will be given in this area to organizations and programs which deliver impact in one or more of the following ways:

·       Enhancing financial literacy among women and under-represented communities

·       Improving access to knowledge and tools among women and under-represented communities

2.       Support entrepreneurs who promote diversity with the resources to strengthen and scale those businesses and contribute to the prosperity of society. Grants will be given in this area to organizations and programs which deliver impact in one or more of the following ways:

·       Equipping women and diverse founders with mentoring and resources

·       Improving access to capital for women and diverse founders

There is no set minimum or maximum grant amount, though the average size of a grant made by the Foundation is $75,000. Reasonable overhead costs may be included in the grant request but must be specified. There is no limit as to the number of proposals a single entity may submit at one time.

Funding amount: $75K average

Deadline: May 10, 2024

Guidelines: https://www.nasdaq.com/nasdaq-foundation/grant-program

Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI)

Freeman Hrabowski Scholars Program

In 2022, HHMI launched the Freeman Hrabowski Scholars program to support outstanding basic researchers, including physician-scientists, who have strong potential to become leaders in their fields and to advance diversity, equity, and inclusion through their mentoring efforts and understanding of systemic exclusion and marginalization in science of trainees from different backgrounds. Scholars prioritize scientific excellence in their own research while creating an inclusive lab climate that serves as a model within their own institutions and beyond. 

Scholars are appointed to a five-year term, renewable for a second five-year term after a successful progress evaluation. Each Scholar receives up to $8.6 million over the ten-year period, including full salary, benefits, a research budget, and scientific equipment. They also participate in professional development to advance their leadership and mentoring skills.  

The 2025 competition is open to individuals who: hold a PhD and/or MD (or equivalent); began their first post-training position and a tenure-track (or equivalent) faculty position on or after March 1, 2020, or have accepted an offer for a tenure-track (or equivalent) position that begins no later than March 1, 2025; have a research focus in the biological and biomedical sciences, working across many scientific disciplines in a wide range of organisms. This is an open competition and there are no limits on the number of applicants or Scholars from an institution.  

Funding amount: Up to $8.6M over 10 yrs

Deadline: May 15, 2024

Guidelines: https://www.hhmi.org/programs/freeman-hrabowski-scholars

Simons Foundation

Pivot Fellowship

The Simons Foundation invites applications for the Pivot Fellowship program which will support researchers who have a strong track record of success and achievement in their current field, and a deep interest, curiosity and drive to make contributions to a new discipline. The fellowship will enable today’s brightest minds to apply their talent and expertise to a new field and will consist of one training year where the fellow will be embedded in a lab of a mentor to learn the new discipline and its culture. Mentorship and support are essential for learning a new discipline and culture. In addition to the qualifications and potential of the applicant, the suitability of the mentor and the environment for mentorship will be strongly considered in the application process.

Fellows and mentors must hold a Ph.D., M.D. or equivalent degree in the natural sciences (astronomy, biology, chemistry, earth sciences, neuroscience and physics), engineering, mathematics, data science or computer science — and all sub-disciplines therein — and be faculty at an academic institution or hold an equivalent position. Fellows must demonstrate that the fellowship will take place in a new discipline, distinct from their current field of study, within astronomy, biology, chemistry, earth sciences, neuroscience, physics or mathematics — and all sub-disciplines therein. In order to receive the fellowship, fellows must be approved by their institution for a full year of leave. Fellows must not hold any other fellowship that will provide them with salary support during the training year of the Pivot Fellowship.

A Pivot Fellowship provides one year of salary support of the fellow’s academic-year salary, whether normally paid over 9 or 12 months and a $10,000 research, travel and professional development allowance during the fellowship training year. Mentors will receive a $50,000 research fund during the fellowship year. The mentor’s research funds may be used for salary support for the mentor and lab personnel, small and large equipment (including major research instrumentation), supplies, travel, publication, tuition and other research expenses. At the end of the fellowship year, fellows will be invited to apply for a three-year research award in the new field for up to $1.5 million over the three-year period.

Funding amount: 1 yr salary support of fellow’s academic-year salary and $10K research, travel, and professional development allowance; $50K research fund for mentors

Deadline: May 15, 2024

Guidelines: https://www.simonsfoundation.org/grant/pivot-fellowship-request-for-applications/

Spencer Foundation

Large Research Grants on Education Program

The Large Research Grants on Education Program supports education research projects that will contribute to the improvement of education, broadly conceived, with budgets ranging from $125,000 up through $500,000 for projects ranging from one to five years. This program is “field-initiated,” meaning that proposal submissions are not in response to a specific request for a particular research topic, discipline, design, or method. Our goal for this program is to support rigorous, intellectually ambitious and technically sound research that is relevant to the most pressing questions and compelling opportunities in education. We seek to support scholarship that develops new foundational knowledge that may have a lasting impact on educational discourse. 

We anticipate that proposals will span a wide range of topics and disciplines that innovatively investigate questions central to education, including for example education, anthropology, philosophy, psychology, sociology, law, economics, history, or neuroscience, amongst others.

Principal Investigators (PIs) and Co-PIs must have an earned doctorate in an academic discipline or professional field, or appropriate experience in an education research-related profession. While graduate students may be part of the research team, they may not be named the PI or Co-PI on the proposal.

Funding amount: $125K-$500K

Deadline: May 22, 2024 (Intent to Apply)

Guidelines: https://www.spencer.org/grant_types/large-research-grant

Spencer Foundation

Racial Equity Research Grants

The Racial Equity Research Grants program supports education research projects that will contribute to understanding and ameliorating racial inequality in education. We are interested in funding studies that aim to understand and disrupt the reproduction and deepening of inequality in education, and which seek to (re)imagine and make new forms of equitable education. Thus, we are interested in research projects that seek to envision educational opportunities in a multiplicity of education systems, levels, settings, and developmental ranges and that reach beyond documenting conditions and paradigms that contribute to persistent racial inequalities.

Our goal for this program is to support rigorous, intellectually ambitious, and technically sound research that is relevant to the most pressing questions and compelling opportunities in relation to racial equity in education. In this cycle of funding, we will continue to fund scholarship focused on a range of communities and issues with respect to equity. We encourage proposals from across the methodological spectrum, including qualitative methods, mixed-methods, and quantitative methods. We want to especially encourage Racial Equity proposals that focus on the following areas: (1) innovative forms of measurement and assessment, (2) artificial intelligence (AI), and (3) current political challenges in k-12 and higher education around diversity, equity, and inclusion.

As with other Spencer grant programs, this program is “field-initiated” in that proposal submissions are not required to be developed around a particular research topic, discipline, design, method, or geographic location.  Principal Investigators (PIs) and Co-PIs applying for a Racial Equity Research Grant must have an earned doctorate in an academic discipline or professional field, or appropriate experience in an education research-related profession. While graduate students may be part of the research team, they may not be named the PI or Co-PI on the proposal.

Funding amount: Up to $75K

Deadline: May 29, 2024

Guidelines: https://www.spencer.org/grant_types/racial-equity-special-research-grants

Caplan Foundation for Early Childhood

Seed Grants for Early Childhood Research and Development Projects

The Caplan Foundation for Early Childhood is an incubator of promising research and development projects that appear likely to improve the welfare of young children, from infancy through 7 years, in the United States. Welfare is broadly defined to include physical and mental health, safety, nutrition, education, play, familial support, acculturation, societal integration and childcare.

Grants are only made if a successful project outcome will likely be of significant interest to other professionals, within the grantee’s field of endeavor, and would have a direct benefit and potential national application. The Foundation’s goal is to provide seed money to implement those imaginative proposals that exhibit the greatest chance of improving the lives of young children, on a national scale. Because of the Foundation’s limited funding capability, it seeks to maximize a grant's potential impact.

The Foundation provides funding in the following areas:

Early Childhood Welfare: Children can only reach their full potential when all aspects of their intellectual, emotional and physical development are optimally supported. Providing a safe and nurturing environment is essential as is imparting the skills of social living in a culturally diverse world. Therefore, the Foundation supports projects that seek to perfect child rearing practices and to identify models that can provide creative, caring environments in which all young children thrive.

Early Childhood Education and Play: Research shows that children need to be stimulated as well as nurtured, early in life, if they are to succeed in school, work and life. That preparation relates to every aspect of a child’s development, from birth to age seven, and everywhere a child learns – at home, in childcare settings and in preschool. We seek to improve the quality of both early childhood teaching and learning, through the development of innovative curricula and research based pedagogical standards, as well as the design of imaginative play materials and learning environments.

Parenting Education: To help parents create nurturing environments for their children, we support programs that teach parents about developmental psychology, cultural child rearing differences, pedagogy, issues of health, prenatal care and diet, as well as programs which provide both cognitive and emotional support to parents.

The Foundation will not fund the operation or expansion of existing programs.

Funding amount: Up to $100K

Deadline: May 31, 2024 (Letter of Inquiry)

Guidelines: https://earlychildhoodfoundation.org/

June Deadlines:

Arnold Ventures

Building Evidence: Support for Causal Studies to Evaluate Social Programs and Policies

Arnold Ventures’ (AV) Evidence and Evaluation team aims to identify, evaluate, and scale evidence-based solutions targeting the nation’s most pressing social problems. This Request for Proposals (RFP) aims to bolster the knowledge base about potentially effective policies, programs, and interventions by funding researchers to conduct rigorous, causal research that aligns with key AV policy areas, including higher education, infrastructure, contraceptive choice and access, and public finance.

·       Higher Education: The Higher Education initiative seeks to identify and scale effective practices that improve student success and address equity gaps in higher education outcomes. Projects responding to this RFP will help build credible evidence about ‘what works’ to improve student success outcomes, including but not limited to student learning, persistence, degree or certificate completion, job placement, post-college earnings, and debt burden.

·       Infrastructure: The Infrastructure initiative supports research, policy development, and advocacy aimed at bolstering U.S. capacity to build infrastructure – including housing, transportation, climate and clean energy infrastructure – faster, better, and at a lower cost. Projects responding to this RFP will expand the knowledge base of ‘what works’ when building infrastructure in the United States at any level of government. This initiative is particularly interested in using rigorous research to address cross-cutting challenges, such as supply-side bottlenecks, accelerating the permitting process, and improving state capacity.

·       Contraceptive Choice and Access: The Contraceptive Choice and Access initiative aims to close the gaps in contraceptive affordability and access via research, policy reform, and implementation. Projects responding to this RFP will evaluate existing policies’ impacts on contraceptive access and identify barriers to care at the state and federal levels. This initiative is most interested in policies targeting contraceptive availability, including contraceptive coverage standards; payment reform; healthcare workforce and staffing issues; expansion of delivery channels (over the counter, pharmacist prescribed, telehealth); and expansion of Medicaid and state funded family care programs.

·       Public Finance: The Public Finance initiative seeks to advance tax and budget policies that both promote fiscal stability in government and advance Americans’ economic opportunity, mobility, and security. Specific areas of interest include place-based policies, such as opportunity zones, benefits programs, and federal or state-level policies encouraging economic development within a community. Broadly, projects under this RFP will help us answer the question “how are tax and benefit policies improving people’s lives?”

Causal research employing strong, quasi-experimental methods are a critical component of the evidence-building process and are important for increasing the knowledge base for decision-makers and stakeholders. Examples of causal research methods include natural experiments, regression discontinuity, difference-in-differences, and instrumental variable designs.

Funding amount: Varies

Deadline: June 1, 2024 (Letters of Interest)

Guidelines: https://craftmediabucket.s3.amazonaws.com/uploads/PDFs/AVEE_BuildingEvidenceRFP_Final.pdf

Kavli Foundation

Societal Considerations for Neurobiology and Changing Ecosystems Research

The Kavli Foundation seeks to fund projects that will advance understanding of the societal considerations related to the emerging scientific area of Neurobiology and Changing Ecosystems (NCE). This work should explore how an evolving research agenda in NCE might incorporate societal and civic considerations. Work may take the form of new scholarship (e.g., science and technology studies, philosophy, or other disciplines), or other activities by scientists, scholars, or practitioners. 

The Kavli Foundation recently launched an initiative to support research in Neurobiology and Changing Ecosystems, including an associated co-funding opportunity with the National Science Foundation. This emerging scientific area provides a unique opportunity to examine neural adaptation and resilience within a societally relevant context. As the emergence of the topic itself is driven by human activity and exists in the context of important societal considerations, it is salient and timely to consider questions, impacts, and priorities of society and publics together with the science itself. 

Funding efforts to date have supported fundamental neuroscience research investigating how neural processes demonstrate resilience to, or are impacted by, changing environments at the cell, molecular or circuit level. Given ongoing, accelerating change throughout the world, understanding how humans and animals respond to change is a critical component for understanding how we adapt, evolve, and survive. In particular, recent rapid, anthropogenic environmental changes are pushing the boundaries of neural systems’ ability to adapt. Current work (see References here) seeks to understand how nervous systems respond to human-generated environmental disruptions, such as chemical and sensory pollution, habitat depletion, and changing climates.  

The Kavli Foundation is seeking to identify, explore, and/or understand key societal perspectives related to Neurobiology and Changing Ecosystems, that can influence the development of the research agenda or identify areas that require further study. This could include work to identify key societal issues or create a framework for how these societal implications would be considered or addressed. The foundation will prioritize funding projects that take a field-wide view. Projects that do not take a similarly broad approach will be considered if the work proposed has the potential to influence research directions, for example, through a collaboration with neurobiology and changing ecosystems researchers. Funds will be used to support projects that identify or carry out scholarship or other efforts that advance the understanding of the societal issues in this field.  

Funding amount: Up to $150K

Deadline: June 3, 2024

Guidelines: Societal Considerations for Neurobiology and Changing Ecosystems Research - The Kavli Foundation (smapply.org)

Vilckek Foundation

Vilcek Prizes for Creative Promise

The Vilcek Prizes for Creative Promise support emerging to mid-career immigrant professionals who have demonstrated exceptional achievements early in their careers. Young immigrant research scientists, visual artists, and curators are welcome to apply.

Applicants in the biomedical science category must have earned a doctoral degree (MD, PhD, or equivalent) and hold a full-time position at an academic institution or other organization. Eligible positions include assistant or associate professor, or equivalent independent position. They must also have at least one publication as corresponding author.

Applicants in the visual art category will be considered across the following areas of practice: painting, drawing, sculpture, photography, printmaking, ceramic, textile, installation, film/video, digital art, performance that manifests in time-based visual presentation, etc. Applicants must have at least five years of professional experience in the visual arts.

Applicants in the curatorial work categories will be considered for having organized and developed single artist or group exhibitions at any scale or extending over any or time period in the following professional capacities: private or public institutions, foundations, independent curatorial practice, biennials or art fairs, galleries, etc. Applicants must have at least five years of professional experience in curatorial work.

Applicants must have been born outside the United States to non-American parents; not be older than 38 years old as of December 31, 2024 (born on or after January 1, 1986); have lived in the United States for at least 4 years; and be one of the following: a naturalized citizen or a permanent resident of the United States; an H-1B or O-1 visa holder with a valid visa stamp; a H-4 visa holder with a valid EAD card; a recipient of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) relief; an asylee or an asylum seeker who has applied for asylum and has a valid EAD card.

Funding amount: $50K prize

Deadline: June 10, 2024

Guidelines: https://vilcek.org/prizes/vilcek-prizes-for-creative-promise/

Greenwall Foundation

Making a Difference in Real-World Bioethics Dilemmas

The Greenwall Foundation is requesting proposals for the Fall 2024 cycle of its bioethics grants program, Making a Difference in Real-World Bioethics Dilemmas. The Making a Difference program supports research to help resolve important emerging or unanswered bioethics problems in clinical, biomedical, or public health decision-making, policy, or practice.

The Foundation’s vision is to make bioethics integral to decisions in health care, policy, and research. Our mission is to expand bioethics knowledge to improve clinical, biomedical, and public health decision-making, policy, and practice. Projects funded under the Making a Difference program should promote the Foundation’s vision and mission through innovative bioethics research that will have a real-world, practical impact. In addition, the Foundation is committed to building a broad and inclusive bioethics that welcomes everyone, elevates many perspectives, asks a wide range of questions, and learns from diverse voices.

While we welcome all innovative proposals that will have a real-world impact, we are particularly interested in proposals that address the ethical and policy issues raised by the following priority topics:

  • Trust in science, medicine, and public health;
  • Bias and discrimination in health care, which may be based on a broad range of characteristics;
  • Public health crises (related to, for example, emerging infectious diseases, climate change, and the opioid epidemic), including their impact on mental health;
  • Healthcare access, costs, and resource allocation.

Proposals for projects that address other real-world, practical bioethics problems are also welcome. 

The research team must have relevant and appropriate expertise to carry out the proposed project. Successful teams commonly involve a bioethics scholar and persons with on-the-ground experience with the bioethics dilemma, for example, in clinical care; biomedical research; biotechnology, pharmaceutical, big data, or artificial intelligence companies; or public service. Such collaboration can specify the bioethics problems that clinicians, researchers, policymakers, public health officials, and others face in their daily work, and facilitate practical resolutions to these problems. Applicants are also encouraged to engage with relevant lay or community stakeholders throughout their project.

Funding amount: Varies

Deadline: June 17, 2024 (Letters of Intent)

Guidelines: https://greenwall.org/making-a-difference-grants/request-for-proposals-MAD-fall-2024

Smith Richardson Foundation

Strategy and Policy Fellows Program

The Smith Richardson Foundation sponsors an annual Strategy and Policy Fellows grant competition to support young scholars and policy thinkers on American foreign policy, international relations, international security, military policy, and diplomatic and military history. The purpose of the program is to strengthen the U.S. community of scholars and researchers conducting policy analysis in these fields. The Foundation will award at least three research grants of $60,000 each to enable the recipients to research and write a book. Within the academic community, this program supports junior or adjunct faculty, research associates, and post-docs who are engaged in policy-relevant research and writing. Within the think tank community, the program supports members of the rising generation of policy thinkers who are focused on U.S. strategic and foreign policy issues. Applicants must be an employee or affiliate of either an academic institution or a think tank. Please note that the Fellowship program will only consider single-author book projects.  It will not consider collaborative projects (e.g., edited or multi-authored books, conference volumes or reports, or a collection of previously published articles, chapters or essays.)

Funding amount: $60K

Deadline: June 17, 2024

Guidelines: https://www.srf.org/programs/international-security-foreign-policy/strategy-policy-fellows-program/

August Deadlines:

William T. Grant Foundation

Research Grants on Improving the Use of Research Evidence and Research Grants on Reducing Inequality

Research Grants on Improving the Use of Research Evidence:

This program supports research on strategies focused on improving the use, usefulness, and impact of evidence in ways that benefit young people ages 5-25 in the United States. We welcome impact studies that test strategies for improving research use as well as whether improving research use leads to improved youth outcomes. We also welcome descriptive studies that reveal the strategies, mechanisms, or conditions for improving research use. Finally, we welcome measurement studies that explore how to construct and implement valid and reliable measures of research use.

We are particularly interested in research on ways to improve the use of research evidence by state and local policymakers, mid-level managers, and intermediaries. These decision-makers play important roles in deciding which programs, practices, and tools to adopt; deliberating ways to improve existing services; shaping the conditions for implementation; and making resource allocation decisions.

We invite studies from a range of disciplines, fields, and methods, and we encourage investigations into various youth-serving systems, including justice, housing, child welfare, mental health, and education. Previous studies have drawn on conceptual and empirical work from political science, communication science, knowledge mobilization, implementation science, and organizational psychology, among other areas.

Finally, we welcome critical perspectives that inform studies’ research questions, methods, and interpretation of findings.

Research Grants on Reducing Inequality:

Research grants on reducing inequality fund research studies that aim to build, test, or increase understanding of programs, policies, or practices to reduce inequality in the academic, social, behavioral, or economic outcomes of young people ages 5-25 in the United States. We prioritize studies that aim to reduce inequalities that exist along dimensions of race, ethnicity, economic standing, language minority status, or immigrant origins.

Our research interests center on studies that examine ways to reduce inequality in youth outcomes. We welcome descriptive studies that clarify mechanisms for reducing inequality or elucidate how or why a specific program, policy, or practice operates to reduce inequality. We also welcome intervention studies that examine attempts to reduce inequality. Finally, we welcome studies that improve the measurement of inequality in ways that can enhance the work of researchers, practitioners, or policymakers.

We invite studies from a range of disciplines, fields, and methods, and we encourage investigations into various youth-serving systems, including justice, housing, child welfare, mental health, and education.

Funding Amount: $100K-$1M (Research Grants on Improving the Use of Research Evidence); $100K-$600K (Research Grants on Reducing Inequality)

Deadline: August 7, 2024

Guidelines: https://wtgrantfoundation.org/funding#current-opportunities

September Deadlines:

Kavli Foundation and the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF)

Neurobiology in Changing Ecosystems (NiCE)

The Kavli Foundation and the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) invite applications for the new Neurobiology in Changing Ecosystems (NiCE) grant program. Research in this emerging field has great potential to reveal novel scientific insights that will accelerate understanding of basic biology in neural adaptation and resilience at the molecular, biophysical, cellular, and circuit levels. Opportunities for investigation of neurobiology and changing ecosystems specifically cover modulatory, homeostatic, adaptive, and/or evolutionary mechanisms that impact neurophysiology in response to anthropogenic environmental influence. Proposals should emphasize interdisciplinary collaborations and integrate diverse methodologies, including environmental monitoring techniques, behavioral and physiological experiments, ecological and evolutionary modeling, combined with traditional approaches in neuroscience investigation.

NiCE proposals should explicitly address the following three criteria:

  • The importance, extent, or urgency of the anthropogenic environmental change being investigated.
  • The relationship between the neural mechanisms under investigation and the organism's fitness in the changing environment.
  • How the results of the project will inform or predict resilience in related neural mechanisms, organisms, or environments.

Funding amount: Varies

Deadline: September 30, 2024

Guidelines: The Kavli Foundation partners with NSF to fund… | Kavli Foundation; Dear Colleague Letter: Neurobiology in Changing Ecosystems (NiCE) (nsf24044) | NSF - U.S. National Science Foundation

Ongoing Deadlines

Arnold Ventures

Causal Research on Community Safety and the Criminal Justice System

Arnold Ventures (AV) is a nonpartisan philanthropy whose core mission is to invest in evidence-based solutions that maximize opportunity and minimize injustice. AV focuses on correcting system failures in the United States through evidence-based solutions. AVs’ Criminal Justice Initiative seeks to generate new evidence to inform policies that will make communities safer and make the criminal justice system more fair and effective. This Request for Proposals (RFP) from the Criminal Justice Initiative (CJI) seeks letters of interest to conduct causal research projects of policies, practices, and interventions related to community safety and the criminal justice system.

To be eligible to submit through this funding opportunity, research projects must adhere to the following criteria:

·       Propose a strong causal research design, which can reliably and validly isolate the treatment effect of a policy, practice, or intervention. Examples of such research designs include difference-in-differences, regression discontinuity, instrumental variable, and randomization.

·       The policy, practice, or intervention being tested is in the United States.

·       Outcomes include measures of real-world behaviors (such as crime rates or criminal justice involvement), as opposed to measures collected in a controlled lab setting or measures of perceptions. Submissions are welcome across all issues of crime and criminal justice that meet the above criteria. The ultimate goal of this RFP is to build credible evidence on policies, practices, and interventions that can improve crime and justice system outcomes and grow the number of policies and practices rigorously shown to produce improvements in community safety and to make the justice system fairer and more effective.

Arnold Ventures anticipates that project budgets will depend on a variety of factors, including the complexity of the data acquisition and analysis plans, the number of study sites, and the study timeline. While there is no budget ceiling or fixed period of performance for applications received under this RFP, we expect to support projects that align with a typical CJI research project that has a 3-4 year period of performance and a median budget of $500,000.

We will prioritize studies that:

•         Focus on interventions where there is a clear path to federal and/or state policy adoption or implementation. Is there a state or federal policy lever available to scale this intervention?

•         Outcomes are measured using administrative data, where they exist.

•         Align with the CJI’s priority research areas: reducing violent crime; reducing unnecessary use of force or arrests by police; facilitating police investigations and increasing clearance rates; effects of alternative models of police/crisis response; reducing intimate partner violence; prosecutor-initiated resentencing; improving pretrial outcomes; strategies to improve the quality of public defense; improving community supervision outcomes; effects of prison oversight; effects of policy changes related to fines and fees or the payment of court debt; effects of record clearance/expungement policies; effects of sentencing reforms; projects using Criminal Justice Administrative Records (CJARS) data to measure effects of interventions on people with criminal records.

•         Are led by researchers who have not previously received funding from Arnold Ventures as the primary or principal investigator, or are early-career/junior researchers (those who received their PhD in the past 6 years). We recognize the need to expand and diversify the pool of researchers doing causal research in the criminal justice space. Thus we strongly encourage researchers who are new to causal research, including those from groups historically underrepresented in the research community – such as researchers of color, women, and justice[1]impacted individuals – to participate in this funding opportunity.

Funding Amount: Varies (anticipated median budget of $500K)

Deadlines: Rolling

Guidelines: https://craftmediabucket.s3.amazonaws.com/uploads/Causual-Research-on-Community-Safety-in-Criminal-Justice-System.pdf

Arnold Ventures

Strengthening Evidence: Support for RCTs to Evaluate Social Programs and Policies

Arnold Ventures’ (AV) Evidence and Evaluation team aims to identify, evaluate, and scale evidence-based solutions targeting the nation’s most pressing social problems. One of the strongest tools in the evidence-building toolkit is the randomized controlled trial (RCT). While not applicable to all policy and program contexts, RCTs are often the strongest choice for evaluating social programs because they fairly compare results between a treatment group and a control group, making it clear whether the program or policy truly works. This strong evidence can be important for informing decision-makers and stakeholders to support effective programs.

This Request for Proposals (RFP) aims to build the body of proven, effective policies, programs, and interventions by funding researchers to conduct rigorous RCTs across the spectrum of social policy.

Proposals that demonstrate alignment with AV’s strategic areas of interest, such as higher education, housing, climate, transportation, and public finance, are encouraged.  A full list of AV areas of investment can be explored here. (RCTs primarily measuring Criminal Justice outcomes will not be considered under this RFP; for such studies, please see this RFP).

Funding amount: Varies

Deadline: Rolling

Guidelines: https://craftmediabucket.s3.amazonaws.com/uploads/PDFs/AVEE_StrengtheningEvidenceRFP_Final.pdf

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Evidence for Action: Innovative Research to Advance Racial Equity

Evidence for Action prioritizes research to evaluate specific interventions (e.g., policies, programs, practices) that have the potential to counteract the harms of structural and systemic racism and improve health, well-being, and equity outcomes. We are concerned both with the direct impacts of structural racism on the health and well-being of people and communities of color (e.g., Black, Latina/o/x, Indigenous, Asian, Pacific Islander people, and other races and ethnicities)—as well as the ways in which racism intersects with other forms of marginalization, such as having low income, being an immigrant, having a disability, or identifying as LGBTQ+ or a gender minority.

This funding is focused on studies about upstream causes of health inequities, such as the systems, structures, laws, policies, norms, and practices that determine the distribution of resources and opportunities, which in turn influence individuals’ options and behaviors. Research should center on the needs and experiences of communities exhibiting the greatest health burdens and be motivated by real-world priorities. It should be able to inform a specific course of action and/or establish beneficial practices, not stop at characterizing or documenting the extent of a problem.

E4A seeks grantees who are deeply committed to conducting rigorous and equitable research and ensuring that their findings are actionable in the real world. In addition to research funding, RWJF also supports grantees with stakeholder engagement, dissemination of findings, and other activities that can enhance their projects’ potential to “move the needle” on health and racial equity. Only through intentional and collaborative efforts to disrupt racism and translate research to action can we hope to build a more just and equitable society and a Culture of Health.

Grant periods are flexible up to 36 months; rare exceptions may be made for projects needing up to 48 months if sufficient justification is provided. Our preference is for projects that produce findings in the near term.

Funding Amount: Varies

Deadline: Rolling

Guidelines: https://www.rwjf.org/en/library/funding-opportunities/2021/evidence-for-action--innovative-research-to-advance-racial-equity.html

Charles Koch Foundation

Trade Policy Research

The Charles Koch Foundation is pleased to invite proposals for research and related projects that bridge the gap between theory and practice and contribute to contemporary debates around important trade-policy issues. We are especially interested in research related to the topics below.

Getting our approach to trade with China right

  • Examining the potential impact of China’s mega-initiatives on the United States, such as the Belt and Road Initiative or China’s large-scale investments in Africa. This could be along economic, social, diplomatic, and/or security lines.
  • Exploring issues and topics related to U.S-China trade and foreign direct investment and implications for national security.
  • Examining how to better protect U.S. intellectual property in China and other markets.
  • Exploring the impact of Chinese tech theft and commercial espionage on American businesses.
  • Examining the real threat of China as compared to the threat claimed by domestic interest groups, businesses, think tanks, and the media.
  • Exploring opportunities for U.S.-China economic cooperation.
  • Exploring the role of the WTO in dispute settlement.

National industrial policy

  • Assessing the historical track record of national industrial policy in the United States.
  • Conducting a comparative analysis of countries’ industrial policies, with a focus on possible lessons for the United States.
  • Exploring alternative means of achieving the stated goals of national industrial policy, e.g. increasing innovation, productivity growth, unemployment gains, etc.

Free trade and flourishing

  • Examining the impact and value of Free Trade Agreements, especially in comparison to managed trade agreements.
  • Presenting solutions to any concentrated costs that may be caused by Free Trade Agreements.

Funding Amount: Varies

Deadline: Rolling

Guidelines: https://charleskochfoundation.org/grants/trade-policy-research/

Smith Richardson Foundation

Domestic Public Policy Program

The mission of the Smith Richardson Foundation is to contribute to important public debates and to address serious public policy challenges facing the United States.  The foundation seeks to help ensure the vitality of our social, economic, and governmental institutions.  It also seeks to assist with the development of effective policies to compete internationally and to advance U.S. interests and values abroad. The Domestic Public Policy Program supports projects that will help the public and policy makers understand and address critical challenges facing the United States.  To that end, the foundation supports research on and the evaluation of existing public policies and programs, as well as projects that inject new ideas into public debates. 

Funding Amount: Varies

Deadline: Concept papers accepted anytime

Guidelines: https://www.srf.org/programs/domestic-public-policy/

Simons Foundation

Targeted Grants in Mathematics and Physical Sciences

The Simons Foundation’s Mathematics and Physical Sciences (MPS) division invites applications for its new Targeted Grants in MPS program. The program is intended to support high-risk projects of exceptional promise and scientific importance on a case-by-case basis. A typical Targeted Grant in MPS provides funding for up to five years. The funding provided is flexible and based on the type of support requested in the proposal. Indirect costs are limited to 20% of direct costs, with the following exceptions: equipment, tuition, and any subcontracts with budgets, including indirect expenses. Indirect costs paid to a subcontractor may not exceed 20% of the direct costs paid to the subcontractor. Expenses for experiments, equipment, or computations, as well as for personnel and travel, are allowable. Applications may be submitted by established U.S. and foreign public and private educational institutions and stand-alone research centers.

Funding Amount: Varies

Deadline: Letter of Inquiry accepted anytime

Guidelines: https://www.simonsfoundation.org/funding/funding-opportunities/mathematics-physical-sciences/targeted-grants-in-mps/

Limited Programs:

Please note: For reference only; deadline has passed

2022 Andrew Carnegie Fellows Program Competition

Limited submission program for sabbatical-eligible faculty (see eligibility) - a university-wide internal nomination process is required. The fellowships of $200,000 each enable recipients to take sabbaticals of one or two years from their institution to focus on research and writing. 

Award Purpose: 

The Carnegie Fellows Program supports high-caliber scholarship in the social sciences and humanities by enabling extraordinary senior or junior scholars, journalists, and public intellectuals to pursue research on pressing issues and cultural transitions, facing us at home and abroad. Institutions are encouraged to nominate those “whose proposals incorporate, among other elements, historical precedents, cultural underpinnings, and moral arguments.”

2022 topics:

Candidates should be proposing work on one of the following topics (additional information available here)
https://www.dropbox.com/s/k266ps4mxaxu21b/AC%20Fellows%20Topics%202021.pdf?dl=

  • Global connections and global ruptures
  • Strengthening U.S. democracy and exploring new narratives
  • Environments, natural and human
  • Technological and cultural creativity—potential and perils

# of nominations: 

Two nominations are permitted from each university: one junior scholar and one senior scholar. (See eligibility below)

Timeline:

Internal university deadline: Fri., Oct. 29, 2021, 5:00 pm (see the internal nomination process below)

The nominee(s) selected to represent Stanford will be notified: Fri., Nov. 5, 2021

Sponsor’s deadline:  Nov. 22, 2021

Fellows announced: April 2022

Start of the fellowship: by September 1, 2022

Guidelines:

https://www.carnegie.org/news/articles/andrew-carnegie-fellows-2022/

Eligibility:

  • Senior, junior, and emerging scholars; journalists; and public intellectuals
  • A “junior” scholar (sabbatical-eligible faculty) will have received the PhD (or terminal degree in the field) ten years ago or fewer (2011-2021).  A junior scholar may hold any title, Assistant Professor, Associate Professor, or Professor. The junior status is determined by the year his/her degree was earned.
  • A “senior” scholar (sabbatical-eligible faculty) is more than ten years out from the PhD or terminal degree
  • U.S. citizenship or permanent U.S. residency status
  • See the award terms below.  

Award terms

  • Fellowships of $200,000 each, enabling recipients to take sabbaticals of one or two years from their institution to focus on research and writing. Fellowships may be used for such expenses as salary, fringe benefits, project-related travel, research assistants, and translators. No indirects are provided to the university.
  • While the fellowship can be paid directly to the individual or through the home institution, Stanford highly recommends that it be paid to the individual. (Please consult your financial advisor and department manager on tax implications, benefits, contributions, etc.) 
  • Carnegie does not fund dissertations, debt repayments, lobbying efforts, the purchase of equipment, or rent. 
  • In accepting the nomination, candidates are affirming that, if chosen for the fellowship, s/he will accept the fellowship. 
  • Recipients may not accept other fellowships in addition to the Carnegie fellowship for the same time period. 

Carnegie’s Selection Criteria and Process:

  • Originality and promise of the idea, as it relates to the four program topics
  • Quality of the proposal
  • Potential impact on the field
  • Record of the nominee
  • Plans to communicate findings to a broad audience
  • Carnegie’s selection process will consist of two stages. First, anonymous, nationally prominent experts in various fields will conduct a preliminary evaluation of nominees’ proposals. Then the top proposals will be forwarded to the members of the jury for their scrutiny and ultimate decision.

STANFORD NOMINATION SELECTION PROCESS:

By Fri., Oct. 29, 2021 5:00pm please send one PDF file containing the following in the order listed below via email attachment to:

Amanda Reilly

Associate Director

University Corporate and Foundation Relations

650-498-7726

amanda.reilly@stanford.edu

File name: Last Name_Carnegie.pdf

1) Title page

2022 Andrew Carnegie Fellows Program

Name of nominee

Nominee Scholar Category:  junior or senior

Title

Department

Email address, phone number

2) Nomination letter from your Department Chair or Dean printed on department letterhead and addressed to the Carnegie Fellows Program Review committee which provides a brief description of the candidate’s qualifications and potential, and how his or her contributions will address pressing issues and cultural shifts affecting us at home and abroad. (This letter is for internal review only.)

3) Internal Application materials 

  • 3-5 page prospectus describing the project, including a projected work plan and approximate time frame. The prospectus should be double-spaced and set at a minimum 12-point font. NB: jurors will not read any prospectus beyond the five-page limit (footnotes and bibliography excepted).
  • CV 
  • Budget in Carnegie’s format: Carnegie’s budget template and instructions are located here
    https://www.carnegie.org/news/articles/andrew-carnegie-fellows-2022/

Selection Process

A committee appointed by the Provost will review applications and select up to two nominees. Applicants will be notified by Nov. 5. The selected nominee(s) will then be asked to provide additional materials (1-page summary of the prospectus, a description of the project in 75 words or fewer, 1-page summary of the CV [bulleted form], a short narrative biography (250-400 words), relevant social media links, and a high-resolution photo). The University Corporate and Foundation Relations office will help assemble and submit the application by November 22, including the necessary institutional letter of nomination.

 

Please click here for limited program announcements